Fluent.Interface


The future is parallel

Although most of us are only running dual core computers, if you have a spare £2000 you can pickup up this G71 quad core notebook from Ausus, and if you belive the hype we will be hitting 80 cores by 2014.

While hardware plays catch up up with moore’s law, Microsoft’s next generation .NET 4 platform  will have a native concurrency run-time.  This is already available in the form of VS 2010 CTP and can be configured run with Windows 2008 Hyper-V to test out the running on virtualized multiple cores.

Parallel programming brings a host or problems for developers when it comes to debugging and diagnosing problems.  It is great to see Microsoft helping to ease this with initiatives such as PLINQ, and the interesting (albeit experimental) Transactional Memory group which looks at how code might be modelled to run as efficiently as database logic for example. 

F# will ship with VS 2010 and is a powerful functional language that is naturally immutable, compiles to .NET IL and supports erlang style message passing.

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MPI.NET library enabling scientific cloud computing

The Message Passing Interface MPI standard to supporting writing software that run across many machines.  It has been used by the scientific community for high performance numerical libraries typically written in C or FORTRAN.

The University of Indiana recently released MPI.NET which requires the Microsoft Computer Server Cluster SDK on Windows 2003, or is naively supported on Windows Server 2008 HPC.

Cloud computing is shifting the way software is developed, so it probably won’t be long before native MPI implementations are supported in respective platforms such as Amazon’s EC2 with python, or naively on Microsoft’s forthcoming clustered offering.

Most software leveraging MPI such as PETSc is programmed in C.  Object oriented libraries have proved popular to programmers, and more recently functional languages such as Microsoft’s new F# (based on OCAML) have taken off as an alternative for mathematical libraries as seen in this blog post by Matthew Podwysocki.